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Maslow before Bloom

Maslow before Bloom

We Must Maslow Before We Bloom Spring. The spring brings with it rain, blooming flowers, and new life. In the classroom, students are growing at incredible rates, friendships are deepening, and testing begins. Spring also brings the time of job applications, interviews, and staffing changes. In a recent conversation with a colleague who is applying for new positions, we had the chance to brainstorm possible interview questions and responses. One question/prompt was to identify the top three values in the classroom and the school. Together we thought of the following: Safety for all - physically, emotionally, psychologically, ... A collaborative school community. High quality teaching and learning. Our initial response was child safety but we expanded it further to safety for all because everyone, every learner at school needs to feel safe - children and adults. Our conversation was such a rich and deep experience for both of us. It brought out our beliefs, passions, and ideas. As I thought further about the conversation, this blog post came to life. We must Maslow before we Bloom. Picture Abraham Maslow was an American psychologist who was best known for his theory called Maslow�s hierarchy of needs, a motivational theory in psychology. Maslow�s theory is that people are motivated to achieve certain needs and that some needs take precedence over others. In his five-tier model of human needs, Maslow called the four bottom levels of the pyramid �deficiency needs.� A person does not feel anything if these four levels are met, but experiences great anxiety if they are not. The bottom four levels include eating, drinking, sleeping, safety needs, social needs, and ego needs (such as self-esteem and recognition). The fifth level of the pyramid is considered a �growth need� because it enables a person to work towards a person�s fullest potential / self actualization. Once a person has met the deficiency needs, s/he can turn their attention to self-actualization. Picture Benjamin Bloom was an American educational psychologist who was best known for his classification of learning objectives known as Bloom�s taxonomy. Bloom�s taxonomy is a set of three hierarchical models - cognitive, affective, and sensory domains - used to classify learning objectives of complexity and specificity. The cognitive model is the one educators are most familiar with and is broken into six levels of objectives or levels of understanding: Knowledge, Comprehension, Application, Analysis, Synthesis, Evaluation. Bloom�s taxonomy is definitely used as a teaching tool to help teachers and curriculum writers carefully plan their lessons, assignments, texts, and questions. ?*One important thing to note is the way Bloom's Taxonomy is often depicted. The levels are often showed in a list format (or a pyramid) which doesn't present the levels of thinking accurately. Knowledge and comprehension is definitely the base two levels. After that the levels are not sequential as depicted in most images. Often referred to as higher levels of thinking, the levels do NOT go in the order of most graphics. You really do not need to apply before you analyze, analyze before you synthesize, or synthesize before you evaluate. In a workshop I had the privilege of presenting titled "Effective Elements of Instruction" the team of presenters and I presented a sunrise graphic for the levels of thinking. After an individual acquires the levels of knowledge and comprehension on any particular subject, they can go to any of the four higher levels of thinking and in any order if they access multiple higher levels. We must Maslow before we Bloom. As educators, we need to ensure that our students� sense of safety and other basic needs are met before we can make significant impact on their learning. Students need to feel respected, cared for, valued, and safe - physically, emotionally, psychologically, � These are basic needs of any individual and a cornerstone to meaningful learning. Throughout the years, one of the many influential phrases that come up in conversations is �students don�t care how much you know until they know how much you care.� We need to make school, the playground, anywhere kids are, a safe place for them to be. We must Maslow before we Bloom. We must Maslow before we Bloom applies to learners of all ages as well. It absolutely applies to adult learners. Any school leader, district administrator, coach, grade level team member, PLC member, � must ensure that the basic needs of all learners are recognized and met. Everyone - teachers, paraprofessionals, specialists, administrative assistants, custodians, parents, relatives, ... - must be respected, valued, heard, recognized, celebrated, supported, ... I remember from my experience in Lesson Study groups through the Silicon Valley Math Initiative (SVMI), norms were always established and addresses at the beginning of every meeting. Some may think the time it takes to review norms cuts into the academic discourse but without it, the conversations are definitely not as respectful, rich, and meaningful. The time invested in establishing and reviewing norms is invaluable. In order to ensure a greater level of productivity, joy, happiness, and collaboration in the work between adult learners, we must attend to everyone�s basic needs. We must Maslow before we Bloom. ?�In teaching � �You can�t do the Bloom stuff until you take are of the Maslow stuff.�� - Alan E. Beck ? What are you doing/will you do to Maslow for your students and colleagues?. Joe Young Math & STEAM Coach / TOSA in Palo Alto Unified School District. @Schoology Ambassador, @ClassDojo Ambassador, @khanacademy Ambassador, @flipgrid Ambassador, @goswivl Pioneer | ?#EdCampSV and #TOSAChat organizer | Servant-Leader, Runner | Jack of all trades. Lifelong Learner

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